Monthly Archive: March 2016

Mar
31

Breastfeeding lowers risk of URIs

Important risk factors for acute otitis media include frequent viral URI, pathogenic bacterial colonization and lack of breastfeeding. Tasnee Chonmaitree, MD, of the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, and colleagues report in the journal Pediatrics that almost 50% of the 367 babies followed between 2008 and 2014 had an ear infection in their …

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Mar
30

Extremely preterm infants prone to neurocognitive deficits

More than half of extremely preterm cohort, born 1 SD below age expectation. The most extreme downward shifts were on measures of executive control and processing speed. Robert M. Joseph, and ELGAN Study Investigators concluded that children born extremely preterm continue to be at significant risk of persistent impairments in neurocognitive function and academic achievement, …

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Mar
28

New biomarker as predictor for UTI in children

Raised Urine heat shock protein (uHSP) 70/Cr may be a useful biomarker for the prediction of urinary tract infection (UTI) in children, with a high sensitivity and specificity, says a study published online March 24 in the journal Pediatric Nephrology. They may also help to differentiate UTI from other infections including bacterial contamination of the …

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Mar
26

Children born moderate-to-late preterm may have reduced lung function

A new research from Sweden has suggested that children born at 32 to 36 weeks gestation may have reduced lung function at age 8 and 16. At age 8 years, adjusted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) was lower in preterm female subjects (–64 mL) vs term female subjects but not in preterm male …

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Mar
24

Sleep deprivation associated with reduced insulin sensitivity

Sleeping less than 8 hours per night is associated with centripetal distribution of fat and decreased insulin sensitivity in adolescents says a cross-sectional multicenter study published online March 21, 2016 in JAMA Pediatrics. Ana Maria De Bernardi Rodrigues, RN, MSc, from the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University Center Nossa Senhora do Patrocinio, Itu, …

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Mar
23

Study reviews reasonable care for normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism

A study evaluating 218 outpatient cases of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT), 187 (86%) of whom were normocalcemic primary hyperparathyroidism (NCPHPT) concluded that while some patients converted to hypercalcemic, mostly within 2 years, few did so after 4 years or later. Helena Šiprová, From the Second Department of Internal Medicine, Masaryk University and St. Anne’s University Hospital …

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Mar
22

Fetal growth restriction may predispose to impaired lung development

Héloïse Torchin, Epidemiology and Statistics Sorbonne Paris Cité Research Center, Obstetrical, Perinatal and Pediatric Epidemiology Team, Paris, France and colleagues report that placenta-mediated pregnancy complications with fetal consequences are associated with moderate to severe BPD in very preterm infants independently of gestational age and birth weight, but isolated maternal hypertensive disorders are not. The results …

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Mar
21

Mother’s Smoking May Affect Child’s Lung Function Decades Later

50 years of follow-up have shown that middle aged people whose mothers smoked heavily may be at significantly increased risk for breathing problems. Researchers found that adults exposed as children to their mother’s smoking were nearly three times more likely than those not exposed to have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Lead author Jennifer Perret …

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Mar
19

New guidance for managing neonates born to mothers with Graves’ disease

Neonates born to mothers with Graves’ disease are at risk for significant morbidity and mortality and need to be appropriately identified and managed. Because there are no consensus guidelines regarding the treatment of these newborns, Dr. Danielle van der Kaay, currently working in the Haga Hospital/Juliana Children’s Hospital in Hague, the Netherlands, and her colleagues …

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Mar
17

Birth of a sibling may decrease risk of obesity

Having a younger sibling before first grade may decrease the risk of a child becoming overweight or obese, suggested a new study published online March 11 in Pediatrics. Rana H. Mosli, PhD, from King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, noted that children who experienced the birth of a sibling between ages 24 and …

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