Monthly Archive: January 2016

Jan
31

CHMP recommends Coagadex to manage deficiency of Factor X

Antihemorrhagic factor X concentrate (Coagadex, Bio Products Laboratory Limited) has been recommended by the European Medicine Agency’s Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) for the treatment, prophylaxis and perioperative management in patients with hereditary factor X deficiency. The injectable product, which was designated as an orphan medicinal product in 2007 and evaluated under …

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Jan
30

AAP guidelines on procedural pain in newborns

A new policy statement has been released by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) on the procedural pain in newbrons. The statement recommends that healthcare facilities both minimize the number of painful procedures performed on newborns and routinely assess and treat pain in these patients. The policy’s first statement was made in 2006 followed by …

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Jan
29

Prenatal vitamin D has a weak effect on wheezing

Two new studies have suggested that pregnant women cannot dramatically reduce the risk of wheezing in their babies by taking vitamin D supplements. However, the studies did show enough benefit for researchers to be optimistic. The studies conducted at the University of Copenhagen and published in January 26 issue of JAMA. “[A] clinically important protective …

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Jan
28

Oral propranolol effectively reduces infantile hemangioma

A meta-analysis of 18 studies reported online January 15 in the journal Pediatrics concluded that propranolol, a beta-blocker was effective in reducing the size and volume of infantile hemangiomas vs placebo and other treatments. The largest mean estimate of expected clearance was for oral propranolol, at 95%, followed by timolol at 62% and intralesional triamcinolone …

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Jan
24

If parents are in debt, says a study from University of Wisconsin-Madison, children’s emotional and social well-being gets accordingly affected

If parents are in debt, says a study from University of Wisconsin-Madison, children’s emotional and social well-being gets accordingly affected. The impact is not the same on adults as it is on children, reports the journal Pediatrics.

Jan
22

Traumatic childhood scars can affect brain for decades

Traumatic childhood can have lasting scars, researchers at University of Michigan Medical School have remarked. The after-effects of childhood neglect and abuse can impact brain for decades to come, reports the journal Psychiatry Research.

Jan
20

Sleep-deprived children react badly to stress

Children reacting badly to stress may be sleep-deprived, says a research published in Physiology and Behavior. Sleep-deprivation has been known to affect physical health and cognitive functions of adolescent children. The study was conducted on urban children with an average age of 13 years.

Jan
12

Paediatrics Update – Allergic diseases and internalizing behaviors in early childhood

Children with allergic rhinitis and allergic persistent wheezing at age 4 years are at increased risk for internalizing behaviors at 7 years of age. This risk appears to be associated with the number of allergic diseases, according to a longitudinal study published in the January 2016 issue of Pediatrics.

Jan
11

Recurrent UTIs in children

Among toilet-trained children, those with both bladder and bowel dysfunction (BBD) and vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) are at higher risk of developing recurrent UTIs than children with isolated VUR or children with isolated BBD and, accordingly, exhibit the greatest benefit from antimicrobial prophylaxis concludes a study in the journal Pediatrics.

Jan
10

Current Gastroenterology Reports Update – Pediatric rectal exam

Indications for the pediatric digital rectal examination (DRE) reported in the January issue of the journal Current Gastroenterology Reports include diarrhea, constipation, fecal incontinence, abdominal pain, gastrointestinal bleeding and anemia. Less well-recognized indications may include abdominal mass, urinary symptoms, neurologic symptoms, urogenital or gynecologic symptoms, and anemia. Physicians avoid DRE in both children and adults …

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