Monthly Archive: October 2015

Oct
28

A world-first study by Queensland University of Technology’s Sleep in Early Childhood Research Group has revealed that pre-schoolers exposed to more light earlier in day tend to weigh more

A world-first study by Queensland University of Technology’s Sleep in Early Childhood Research Group has revealed that pre-schoolers exposed to more light earlier in day tend to weigh more. Researchers noted that moderate intensity light exposure earlier in the day was associated with increased body mass index (BMI) while children who received their biggest dose …

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Oct
28

Eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables as a young adult may help lower coronary artery calcium (CAC)

Eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables as a young adult may help lower coronary artery calcium (CAC), a known predictor of CV events, up to two decades later, suggests new research published online October 26 in Circulation.

Oct
26

New research, scheduled to be presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference & Exhibition

New research, scheduled to be presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference & Exhibition, suggests that maternal stress levels benefit from skin-to-skin contact after birth.

Oct
23

New research suggests that introducing peanuts to babies between 4-11 months of age can reduce allergy risk

New research suggests that introducing peanuts to babies between 4-11 months of age can reduce allergy risk. The findings are published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Oct
21

Altered connectivity in the developing brain may underlie neuropsychiatric disorders and motor impairment associated with preterm birth

Altered connectivity in the developing brain may underlie neuropsychiatric disorders and motor impairment associated with preterm birth, suggest two new studies presented at the Society for Neuroscience 2015 Annual Meeting.

Oct
20

The findings are published in the Journal of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus.

New research suggests that watching 9 hours of dichoptic movies over 2 weeks leads to a significant improvement in vision for children with lazy eye or amblyopia. The findings are published in the Journal of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus.

Oct
19

When a pregnant woman has gestational diabetes

When a pregnant woman has gestational diabetes, her unborn child tends to react more slowly to sounds after the mother consumes sugary foods or drinks compared to the offspring of a woman without the disorder, suggests a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. The findings suggest that mother’s metabolism can …

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Oct
17

Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) seems to be a more virulent pulmonary pathogen than rhinovirus or other enterovirus strains

Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) seems to be a more virulent pulmonary pathogen than rhinovirus or other enterovirus strains, suggests a study conducted in children, published online October 13 in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Oct
15

Stimulant medication for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

Stimulant medication for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) does not affect heart rate or blood pressure and can be safely administered in this patient population, suggests new research presented at the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics 2015 Annual Meeting.

Oct
01

Contrary to previous research

Contrary to previous research, a new study published in PLos One suggests that breastfeeding does not improve a child’s intelligence.