Monthly Archive: May 2015

May
31

One night of poor sleep significantly decreases performance on intelligence tests in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD)

One night of poor sleep significantly decreases performance on intelligence tests in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and also in neurotypical children (without ASD), suggests new research published in the Journal of Psychophysiology.

May
31

Delayed umbilical cord clamping benefits fine motor and social skills in early childhood, especially among boys

Delayed umbilical cord clamping benefits fine motor and social skills in early childhood, especially among boys, suggest results from a small randomized study published online in JAMA Pediatrics.

May
30

Alan R. Schroeder, MD, from the Department of Pediatrics, Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, San Jose, California

Alan R. Schroeder, MD, from the Department of Pediatrics, Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, San Jose, California, and colleagues report in the June issue of Pediatrics that urinalysis in young infants with bacteremic urinary tract infection (UTI) is more sensitive than previous research suggested it was in infants with UTI in general.

May
30

New research suggests that measuring the circumference of the mid-upper arm was the most accurate predictor of under-nutrition in children with diarrhea

New research suggests that measuring the circumference of the mid-upper arm was the most accurate predictor of under-nutrition in children with diarrhea, and that children with diarrhea are misdiagnosed more often if weight is sole criterion. The research was published in the Journal of Nutrition.

May
29

Infants who live at higher altitudes may be at greater risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)

Infants who live at higher altitudes may be at greater risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), suggested a new study published in Pediatrics. Researchers noted that infants who resided at an altitude of 8,000 ft or higher were at 2.3 times greater risk of SIDS, COMPARED with infants who lived at an altitude below …

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May
29

A large, cross-sectional study of almost 7000 children aged 7 to 9 years has confirmed that visual impairment is rarely the cause of pediatric reading problems

A large, cross-sectional study of almost 7000 children aged 7 to 9 years has confirmed that visual impairment is rarely the cause of pediatric reading problems. Hence, the common practice of vision-based interventions is unlikely to help in treating youngsters with severe reading impairment. The findings were published online May 25 in Pediatrics.

May
28

Obese male teenagers are more than twice as likely to develop colorectal cancer by middle age

Obese male teenagers are more than twice as likely to develop colorectal cancer by middle age, and those with a high level of systemic inflammation are also at increased risk, suggests a large cohort study published online May 26 in Gut.

May
28

Infants who undergo regional anesthesia are less likely to experience apnea after surgery than infants who undergo general anesthesia

Infants who undergo regional anesthesia are less likely to experience apnea after surgery than infants who undergo general anesthesia, suggest two multinational studies published online in Anesthesiology.

May
27

Healthy mothers and children are frequently colonized with pathogenic Escherichia coli that are resistant to ciprofloxacin as well as multiple additional antibiotics

Healthy mothers and children are frequently colonized with pathogenic Escherichia coli that are resistant to ciprofloxacin as well as multiple additional antibiotics, suggests new research published online in the Journal of Infectious Diseases

May
27

Urinalysis (UA) in young infants with bacteremic urinary tract infection (UTI)

Urinalysis (UA) in young infants with bacteremic urinary tract infection (UTI) is more sensitive than previous research suggested it was in infants with UTI in general, reported new research published online May 25 and in the June issue of Pediatrics.

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