Monthly Archive: March 2015

Mar
31

Adolescent patients who need scoliosis surgery may benefit most from going to a hospital that performs a high volume of the procedures

Adolescent patients who need scoliosis surgery may benefit most from going to a hospital that performs a high volume of the procedures, suggests new research from NYU Langone spine surgeons presented at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons 2015 Annual Meeting.

Mar
31

Children whose early childhood is spent in a home with siblings, which serves as a marker for exposure to microbes early in life

Children whose early childhood is spent in a home with siblings, which serves as a marker for exposure to microbes early in life, tend to be at lower risk of developing juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), suggests an Australian study published online in Arthritis and Rheumatology.

Mar
30

Lifestyle-related cardiometabolic risk factors cluster already in children in the same way as in adults, suggests new research from the University of Eastern Finland.

Lifestyle-related cardiometabolic risk factors cluster already in children in the same way as in adults, suggests new research from the University of Eastern Finland. The results revealed that risk factor levels even lower than those generally accepted as risk factor thresholds for type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic vascular disease are harmful when several risk factors …

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Mar
30

More schooling — and the more mentally challenging problems tackled in those schools — may be the best explanation for the dramatic rise in IQ scores during the past century

More schooling — and the more mentally challenging problems tackled in those schools — may be the best explanation for the dramatic rise in IQ scores during the past century, often referred to as the Flynn Effect. These findings also suggest that environment may have a stronger influence on intelligence than many genetic determinists once …

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Mar
29

Measuring minimal residual disease (MDR)

Measuring minimal residual disease (MDR), or the amount of leukemic cells in the bone marrow, on day 19 and 46 of therapy initiated to induce remission offers considerable guidance on how pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) should be clinically managed, suggests a report published online in the Lancet Oncology.

Mar
29

A new study shows that hepatitis B virus (HBV)

A new study shows that hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection exposure increases the immune system maturation of infants, which may give a better survival advantage to counteract bacterial infection during early life. The study is published March 25 in Nature Communications.

Mar
28

Children conceived with assisted reproductive technology (ART)

Children conceived with assisted reproductive technology (ART) are twice as likely to receive a diagnosis of autism compared with their counterparts who are conceived naturally, suggests new research published online in the American Journal of Public Health.

Mar
28

Kids exposed to parental smoking are more likely to develop carotid atherosclerotic plaque as young adults than kids who are not exposed to secondhand smoke

Kids exposed to parental smoking are more likely to develop carotid atherosclerotic plaque as young adults than kids who are not exposed to secondhand smoke, suggests a new study published in Circulation.

Mar
27

Young children who received the 4CMenB vaccine as infants to protect against serogroup B meningococcal disease had waning immunity by age 5

Young children who received the 4CMenB vaccine as infants to protect against serogroup B meningococcal disease had waning immunity by age 5, even after receiving a booster at age 3½, suggested new research published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Mar
27

Conscientious children are less likely to smoke in later life and the personality trait could help explain health inequalities

Conscientious children are less likely to smoke in later life and the personality trait could help explain health inequalities, suggests a study published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

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