Monthly Archive: May 2014

May
31

More than three–quarters of children with active epilepsy have behavioral problems and/or cognitive impairment, report findings from the Children with Epilepsy in Sussex Schools (CHESS) study

More than three–quarters of children with active epilepsy have behavioral problems and/or cognitive impairment, report findings from the Children with Epilepsy in Sussex Schools (CHESS) study. The findings were published online May 26 in Pediatrics.

May
31

Among severely obese adolescents, laparoscopic adjustable gastric–band surgery appears to be a reasonable option for weight loss after all other interventions have failed

Among severely obese adolescents, laparoscopic adjustable gastric–band surgery appears to be a reasonable option for weight loss after all other interventions have failed, reported a study presented at the 2014 European Congress on Obesity.

May
30

A study published online in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases has revealed that most of the kids with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)

A study published online in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases has revealed that most of the kids with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) who begin currently recommended treatment within 6 months of diagnosis have increased likelihood of attaining inactive disease within 2 years, and

May
30

A community program of prenatal screening for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV)

A community program of prenatal screening for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and use of neonatal immunoprophylaxis for infants born to HBV–positive women is highly effective in preventing perinatal transmission, reports a study published online May 26 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

May
29

An article published in Pediatric Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology has revealed that despite efforts to control allergen release in phones

An article published in Pediatric Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology has revealed that despite efforts to control allergen release in phones, many phones release levels of metals, such as nickel and chromium, which are sufficient to induce allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Nickel sensitization appears common in children, resulting in ACD prevalence levels of up to 33%.

May
29

Maternal intake of dietary methyl donors during the first trimester of pregnancy alters the risk of developing childhood asthma at age 7

Maternal intake of dietary methyl donors during the first trimester of pregnancy alters the risk of developing childhood asthma at age 7, reports a new study presented at the 2014 American Thoracic Society International Conference.

May
28

An article published in the June issue of Pediatrics has revealed that macrolide treatment of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

An article published in the June issue of Pediatrics has revealed that macrolide treatment of Mycoplasma pneumoniae may or may not benefit children with community–acquired lower respiratory tract infection (CA–LRTI).

May
28

A report published online May 26 in Pediatrics provides guidance on the use of drug testing for pediatricians and other clinicians

A report published online May 26 in Pediatrics provides guidance on the use of drug testing for pediatricians and other clinicians. Drug testing has been found as appropriate in situations like truly emergent situations like accident, suicide attempt; assessment of behavior problems including fatigue, excessive moodiness; and as part of a therapy program for substance …

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May
27

According to a policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics published in the June issue of Pediatrics

According to a policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics published in the June issue of Pediatrics, pregnant and breast–feeding women should take a supplement with adequate iodide, as recommended by the American Thyroid Association. Additionally, pregnant and lactating women and their infants must avoid exposure to excess nitrate, found in contaminated well water, …

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May
27

According to a new study, almost half of “alternative” teenagers – that is, teens identifying as belonging to goth

According to a new study, almost half of “alternative” teenagers – that is, teens identifying as belonging to goth, emo and punk subcultures – were involved in self–harm, and nearly 1 in 5 have attempted suicide. The study is published in BMC Psychiatry.

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