Monthly Archive: August 2013

Aug
28

Infants or neonates with HIV

Infants or neonates with HIV, early treatment followed by a drug holiday yielded better results than deferring treatment until it was medically necessary. A study reported in The Lancet found that children in the programmed therapy interruption arms were significantly less likely to die or to have treatment failure than those on deferred therapy. They …

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Aug
28

Long-term follow-up in children

Long-term follow-up in children undergoing hemispherectomy for refractory epilepsy showed that most were seizure-free and able to walk independently, but deficits in many areas of daily function were common. According to Ajay Gupta, MD, of the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio, and colleagues, among 115 children with a mean of 6.05 years of follow-up, 70 were …

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Aug
24

Infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis

A new genetic study suggests that the most common form of gastrointestinal obstruction in infants might be linked to low cholesterol levels. Bjarke Feenstra, PhD, of the Statens Serum Institute in Copenhagen, and colleagues have found a new genetic variant linked to infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) on the long arm of chromosome 11. The …

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Aug
24

Bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates may be associated with increased health risks

Two research articles published online August 19 in Pediatrics add to evidence that bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates may be associated with increased health risks for children and adolescent. However, an accompanying commentary casts doubt on the articles because of the measure of exposure used in the studies.

Aug
19

Blood cultures are not required for children with uncomplicated SSTIs

Blood cultures are not required for children with uncomplicated skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), but they are required in children with complicated SSTIs. According to Dr. Jay R. Malone from The University of Oklahoma in Oklahoma City and colleagues, doing a blood culture for evaluation of immunocompetent children who are hospitalized for SSTI may …

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Aug
17

Childhood Obesity Increases The Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease

Childhood obesity not only increases the risk of cardiovascular disease in later life but also is linked to cardiovascular damage before adulthood, according to a review of evidence published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology by Angela Devlin, PhD, and colleagues at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. Clinical evidence is …

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Aug
17

Intermittent Positive-Pressure Ventilation

The use of nasal intermittent positive-pressure ventilation (IPPV) shows no significant improvement over nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) as a noninvasive ventilation strategy for vulnerable preterm infants, according to research published in the August 15 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. No significant difference between nasal IPPV and nasal CPAP in the …

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Aug
17

Childhood Epileptic Encephalopathies

Researchers have identified genetic defects that might cause infantile spasm and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), two devastating childhood epileptic encephalopathies. Exome sequencing technique was used to search for de novo mutations, which selectively targets critical protein-coding regions of the genome and allows for analysis of larger samples than is practical with the alternative whole-genome sequencing. The …

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Aug
17

Treatment of children with high-risk hepatoblastoma,

A new approach to the treatment of children with high-risk hepatoblastoma, especially those with metastasis has led to dramatic improvement in the survival of these children, according to the results of a new study reported in the August 17 edition of the Lancet. The new chemotherapy regime involved dose-dense (weekly) preoperative administration of cisplatin, in …

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Aug
14

Simple Rule May Enable Emergency Departments

According to Kathy Boutis, MD, from the Department of Emergency Medicine and the Department of Pediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, and colleagues, use of a simple rule may enable emergency departments (EDs) to significantly reduce the number of radiographs ordered for children who present with ankle injuries. The study involved …

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